Wednesday, 9 October 2019

Getting a feel for the place.

One of the considerations of creating the castle in MDF was how do we ‘sell’ the illusion of an Austrian Schloss? By its very nature our adopted building process produces flat panels to assemble, perfect for square or regular shaped units, but a little problematic for a building that has continuously evolved since the ninth century.     
This becomes doubly difficult when you consider that James has no actual plans to work from, but instead is working from a series of photographs.  That said the infoweb is a wonderful thing and If you are prepared to put the time in then it will, eventually, throw up all manner of useful source material.  So it was that James was able to construct the basic design.  We have decided to progress one section at a time, starting with the smaller, more accessible sections, which allows us to resolve any issues that may arise along the way before we tackle the main structure.  This particular section is located to the North of the main hall and looks as if it should act as an entrance hall from the courtyard.  

Although a relatively straight forward shape, the photographs appear to show that this area is rendered stone and to recreate this we simply used some ‘play sand’, kindly donated from the recently abandoned nursery building next to the studio.  This was duly mixed with PVA glue and liberally spread over the surface of the structure.  Although some my baulk at stone painted grey, the images suggest that the ravages of time have, in fact, left the castle that exact colour, although with a yellow ochre tinge to it.  Some of the masonry has a cleaner, almost whitewashed, feel to it and I am assuming that this has indeed been painted.
Another other design idea has been to create interior panels that have the effect of creating a rebate on the windows and the doors.  This has helped to create a sense of depth, again breaking the flatness of the traditional MDF unit.
When the sand and PVA mix was finally dry, a series of heavy dry brushes were applied until we were started to achieve the desired effect.  When it came to detailing the interior, James had found an amazing shot that we were keen to replicate along with the heavy wooden doors at both ends.  The benches are just strips of card and balsa would, whilst the heraldic devices are 3D printed shields from ‘Winterdyne Commission Modelling’.
For me the success of the piece is in the subtle devices James has used in the build.  The rebutted windows are inspired and although the texture and painting is nothing new, we are both genuinely thrilled to see this first section complete.  There is a real belief that we can pull this off, but we still have an awfully long way to go! 



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62 comments:

  1. Both of your attention to detail on this first section is awesome, with the windows you can use acetate sheets to simulate glass, and with careful cutting can even do broken pains and bullet holes, if you have the time

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    1. Thank you Dave. Acetate is a great shout and we wondered about glazing. We are holding off for the moment until we get a bit more done just to see if there are any considerations like lighting.

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    2. Lighting now that gets interesting, plus having an effective power supply, here if you need any help or advice mate

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    3. Thank you Dave, still an idea at the moment, but we have a power supply for the day, so we are thinking of ways of getting the most from our investment.

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  2. Having just come out of a convention build myself, I have caught up with your work on the Schloss and I must say I am flabbergasted by the work done already and your vision for the finished game. Amazing effort.

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    1. Thank you so much Furt and great to have to back in the Blogosphere again!

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  3. That's a cracking start mate. Its really going to be quite something when it is finished!

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    1. Thank you Millsy, really pleased with where we have got to so far, but we are under a bit of a time constraint.

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  4. Lovely work so far and it's nice to tie down a technique on something smaller scale before starting on the larger bits!
    Best Iain

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    1. Thank you Iain. Good old sand and PVA is working nicely. We shall have to look at other considerations with the more intricate sections, but so far so good.

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  5. It's really taking shape and the effects that you are using on the exterior are working well. Used dried tea leaves are good for dead ivy or fallen leaves.

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    1. Thank you Phil, that's really kind of you. Love the idea of dried tea leaves for dead ivy and it just so happens that I know someone that enjoys a cup or two - James save your teabags!

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  6. Jeeze, that's a real monster-build! You guys have done an awesome job so far indeed.

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    1. Thank you my friend! Starting to wonder where the pupils are going to sit after half term though! ;)

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    2. plenty of space in the hallway me thinks ;-)

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    3. Very tempting, but not sure I am going to get away with that! ;)

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  7. My word this is going to be impressive!!

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  8. The Schloss is certainly coming along nicely :)

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  9. This is going to be outstanding, it's rare to see as much attention to detail inside a building as outside, as you say a long way to go but there's still plenty of time, well maybe!
    Good luck

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    1. Thank you! I suppose the interiors are really for the benefit of the lecture, but we are having a lot of fun with them.

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  10. Keeps getting better and better

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  11. And the EPIC continues to build! Great work to the both of you!

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    1. Thank you Terry, seeing this next to the main structure is certainly giving us a sense of scale.

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  12. Looking great so far, and it will be visually very striking when it is done!

    For the windows, have you considered printing on overhead material and then cutting out? James could certainly whip something up in CAD and then a pair of scissors could cut the material easily.

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    1. Thank you so much! Are you thinking to add another layer to the windows or just make the space and then insert frames and glazing as one - which I have to say does sound like a good idea.

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    2. Yes, the carcass of the building is done in MDF as now, then the layer of windows and glazing, and then the interior paneling, which sandwiches the windows in.

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  13. Fantastic work, so very well captured here, although I don't think the photos do your fine work enough justice. It really is special in real-life' folks!

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    1. Thank you so much James, really looking forward to getting our teeth into the next piece though.

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  14. That is impressive! I had to look twice to see the differences between the photo of the hall and the model.

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    1. Thank you A.J. I was thrilled with that shot too.

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  15. Looks superb Michael, love the interior...

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  16. Can't wait to see a finished project as with such attention to details it is going to look magnificent!

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    1. Thank you Mr. Nimrod, we are really enjoying ourselves, but need to keep on track.

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  17. That looks great. This will very spectacular when all complete!

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  18. Wow this is breathtaking work & will be a master piece when done :)

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    1. Thank you Frank, just need to keep plugging away.

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  19. I really got inspired by this project of yours.Nice details and a lot of scenarios to play. I am very fond of the game from westwind: Secrets of the third reich. I will probably make my evil laboratory and also the castle very soon to play missions.

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    1. Thank you Ptr, I love the idea of a secret laboratory - wow!

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  20. Absolutely amazing Michael! So glad you are documenting the build like this, it will be really fun to be able to go back through everything once it's complete ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Thank you Ivor. It is also helping to push us on, trying to have something new to show each week.

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  21. That´s great..the interior pics look very believable.

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    1. Thank you Paul, it is really starting to come together.

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  22. Absolutely loving watching this progress. Your attention to detail is fantastic.

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    1. Thank you Dai, we are definitely enjoying the process but find that we both keep getting distracted.

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  23. Gorgeous Michael! Absolutely gorgeous! Love the attention to detail you both put into this.

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    1. Thank you so much Nick, really appreciate that.

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  24. Very, very impressive, Michael! Already a masterpiece.

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    1. Thank you Dean, incredibly kind of you, but we have a long way to go.

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  25. Wonderful to see the detail you're entering into with this project - no cutting corners then!
    It was however quite a shock to see the scale of the thing in the final photograph when the size of the piece you have finished is abutted onto the main structure - that's still quite a lot of work to do. I'm sure your collective minds are already considering how to accomplish the ultimate goal and I wish you both good luck.

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    1. Thank you so much Joe. we want to do the best job we can on this and find ourselves really pushing each other to do our best work. It is quite a buzz!

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  26. Your dedication to research in order to get the details right is admirable. I'm sure it was enjoyable too :)

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    1. Thank you and it really is, just so much to do.

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