Friday, 28 February 2014

Whitechapel 1888… the build.

I must start by saying just how overwhelmed, but how very grateful I am at all the positive comments and feedback that I received for 'Whitechapel 1888'.  The vignette really was a labour of love, but serves very little purpose other than allowing me to experiment with painting and model making techniques - something that I particularly enjoy.   


Throughout the process I took a series of photographs to catalogue its development and thought that I would share them here as a form of 'how to', although it must be stressed that many of the ideas and details that are used have been 'reappropriated' from other more talented chaps out there.  The initial build is based on a humble CD and built up with foam core with a plastic window frame (available from Antenocitis Workshop) cut into it. 


Model railway preformed plasticard was used to represent the brickwork, with additional strips of plain plasticard employed to add further detail around the window.  Other details included the broken down pipe, which is a plastic tube affixed with some paper fasteners. Vallejo Oxide Paste is a great product, much finer than my usual basing medium it adds a fine texture to the surface of what you are painting whilst having the added advantage of sealing any gaps; the was liberally spread around the build to enhance the texture.


From quite early on, I had a notion that I wanted some form of simple gutter  that the blood would flow into, all very cinematic I know, but I couldn't shake it.  I managed to solve this by raising the pavement using simple Styrofoam sheet.  This had the added benefit of allowing me to 'drawn' into with a biro to achieve the flagstones.  The gutter was created by thinning the sheet and facing of the remaining edge with some miniature bricks.  


In a bid to save some time I thought I would use the same preformed plasticard for the base to represent cobbles and duly stuck it down only to find 24 hours later that something had disagreed with the plastic, buckling the floor - disaster!


 Fortunately it was at this point that I heard that we had all been granted an extension and set about using the time to rebuild my little piece of London town.  I was also mightily relieved to see that the bricks used for the wall had stayed in place, particularly as I had worked hard on my first attempt at Object Source Lighting created by the lamppost.


In order to give the illusion that this horrific crime was going on under the noses of the everyday people, I needed a device that could break up the scene, shielding Jack and his victim from sight.  I stumbled upon the idea of a clothes line and actually found an image of some actual Victorian   street clotheslines that were been sold at a reclamation yard and fashioned my own version from bits of plastic, wire and tissue paper.  It is also removable, allowing me to potentially reuse the street as a possible location for future photo-shoots!


The addition of a Reaper Boners Rat swarm and liberally sprayed water and blood effects complete the scene.  My plans for the next two bonus rounds may need to be reigned in a bit now, especially having given this one so much attention, but I am delighted with how it finally came together.









50 comments:

  1. Very, very nice piece Michael. Congrats.

    I am intrigued by the buckled plasticard. Looks like the kind of thing that happens when you put it next to a heat source. What did you stick it down with?
    I'm wondering if the hole in the cd was a factor, letting heat/air in under the plastic. Maybe use the cd next time as a template to cut out of hardboard? Just a thought.
    Wonderful stuff, as always!

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    1. Thank you Mike and for the great suggestion too. The floor was stuck down with Bostik all purpose and although it didn't melt it, it soon buckled. I guess I'll stick to PVA in future - the irony was that I was looking for a quick fix.

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  2. I was an awesome build Michael, simply breath taking.
    I must admit I too am curious at what caused such issues with the plastics. What sort of glue did you use?

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    1. Thank you so much Scott, the offending glue was Bostik All Purpose.

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  3. Bad luck with the CD base there, but you bounced back from this minor problem quite nicely - well done!

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    1. Thank you Ev, glad to get it finished on time though.

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  4. Awesome build Michael - it set the scene perfectly for that submission

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    1. Thank you Tamsin, that is very kind of you to say so.

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  5. In my oppinion definitely the best entry of this themed round... maybe even of all the themed rounds to date.I really like all the tiny details you put into this vignette to bring it alive.

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    1. That is incredibly kind of you, I am humbled by your kind words, especially given the high quality of entries this year.

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  6. It did set the scene very well indeed. Excellent work Sir.

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  7. Fantastic building, sir. A great lot of work!!!

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  8. Excellent WIP pictures.
    Many thanks for this look behind the scenes, Michael.

    Cheers
    Stefan

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    1. Thank you Stefan and you are more than welcome.

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  9. Excellent pics, great explanations for this inspired work!

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  10. Great modeler's vision and moxie to bring it all together into a very art-like and enjoyable diorama. Nice!

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    1. Thank you so much Jay, loved putting this together.

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  11. Great WIP Michael , and real realistic !
    Cheers .

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  12. great job, thanks for sharing the WIP!
    bye

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  13. Nice to see it built up from scratch thanks for posting. It looked fantastic despite the funny reaction with the base and the layer of cobbles.

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    1. Thank you Simon, it was great fun trying to work out how to bring it together.

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  14. Every part of this creation was wonderful

    Ian

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  15. As always Michael, your inventive nature shines through - although I'm not sure what the Saintly Mrs Awdry will say when she sees what's happened to her favourite Levellers CD!!!

    Pip pip

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    1. Thank you so much my good man, but not a word to the SMA!

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  16. Brilliant!! Thanks for the walkthrough Michael!

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  17. This is an inspired and amazing work! Thanks for sharing the backstory on construction.

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    1. You are more than welcome and thank you Monty.

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  18. Fantastic stuff Michael. You really should think about publishing something on building vignettes. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thank you Millsy, not sure about a book, but you never know!

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  19. I agree with Moiterei_1984. It's been the best of the themed rounds, and as a whole, I think it's a very good candidate for Challenger's Choice. You did a splendid job.

    Now you just have to build the rest of London to go with it.

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    1. Thank you so much Rob, I really appreciate that - as for the rest of London, who knows, maybe one day.

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  20. Replies
    1. That's far too kind, but thank you.

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  21. Hola
    En una palabra MAGNIFICO
    un saludo

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    1. That is incredibly kind of you J.D.

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  22. Missed this one, but glad to see it now!
    What a stunning base this is, my compliments!

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  23. I like the way you put this together...very realistic

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