Monday, 15 April 2013

Something For The Pot...

...the build


Still flushed with my success in scooping the 'Challengers' Choice' award in the '3rd Annual Analogue Hobbies Painting Challenge' it suddenly occurred to me that I haven't actually posted the work in progress shots that I took as the project developed.

The cannibals themselves had been an impulse purchase having recently finished reading Robert Edric's, 'The Book of the Heathen'.  Hugely entertaining to do they had received some favourable feedback including one seemingly throw away comment from Dave D of 'One man and his brushes' who wrote,

Rather fine - they are stunners Michael.  Now where is the big cooking pot? - you could use blinky lights as the fire, and then you would need water for the pot- come on you know you want too.. :-)

Well that was it, the seed was sown and when shortly after that a pair of blinky lights arrived in the post from Dave, I knew I was doomed.  Having squirrelled together some other bits and pieces including  Games Workshop skulls, some more North Star Miniatures Cannibals and baboons (I had recently read their on line article about converting them to Mandrills) I promptly hit a snag and the whole project got mothballed.  When the challenge came around it was Dave again that pointed out that there were other non military categories available and the whole project rose phoenix like from the yet to be lit ashes.  


The problem that had stalled the project the first time around still needed to be resolved though - what to use for the pot?  I had considered all manner of items including doll's house furniture and various tops from plastic bottles, but nothing seemed to come close to what I imagined in my minds eye - pulp, yet robustly built.  In the end it was a humble table tennis ball that came to my rescue, the top third cut and inverted to give the impression of depth without having to resort to filling the whole thing with stew!  Greenstuff, ball bearings, beads and a plastic zombie's arm became the dish of the day and the project was well and truly back under steam.



I knew I had to build a space to hide the blinky and from that came the idea of a separate platform, with a shelf of skulls, a macabre trophy cabinet.  I had envisaged the 'chef' overseeing proceedings from here, but was running the risk of the the whole project towering out of control and becoming too vertical in its build so instead opted for the Mandrill guardians to be patrolling the higher areas.  



I imagined this pot to have been in use for some time, becoming an old favourite that couldn't be thrown away, patched and made good as the need arose.  With this in mind I cut up strips of foil and glued in a haphazard manner, but be careful with what glue you use or you could find your balls shrivelling in front of your eyes - something to be avoided at all costs!  As for rivets, I invested in a mini hole punch which was perfect for punching through sheets of plastic card, plenty more projects for this in the future.




With a few snips and judicious placement of some greenstuff a couple of humble baboons become the mysterious and vicious guardians of the pot.  All that remained was a liberal spreading of pumice gel, a few small stones and some chain and the build was complete, just the painting then!


The painting was actually fairly straightforward with many of the lessons learnt from 'A Tale 3 Painters' and the use of metallics, matt medium and glazes all revisited to good effect.  The soup, once painted, was covered in Vallejo's 'Still Water' medium just to really sell the illusion; tufts, static grass and vines all helped to complete the project.

completed base with blinky light


That, as they say, was that; a hugely entertaining modelling and painting project and one that had started off as little more that comment on a post.  It is these impulse projects that are often the most rewarding and this was no exception, but where next?




Finally I've managed to take some decent photographs showing off the blinky to its full effect. 






51 comments:

  1. Very, VERY Impressive Michael - you have me in awe once again!

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    Replies
    1. That is too kind Sir, thank you very much.

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  2. Very clever workmanship, Sir, most ingenious! :-)

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  3. Very nifty idea, Michael. You're a deserved winner!

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    Replies
    1. That is incredibly kind of you Sir.

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  4. I really enjoyed seeing how you put all this together. Some really clever ideas. I especially like the ball bearing bubbles. I expect to see loads more cooking pots from other people in the next year or so, inspired by this.

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    1. Thank you Clint, I hope to use the rivets again in the not too distant future.

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  5. Great project Sir Michael, and it thoroughly deserved it's win in the Challenge.

    "be careful with what glue you use or you could find your balls shrivelling"

    Sound advice for all male model makers/painters ;)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Tamsin, I like to think that I'm here to help others learn from my mistakes! ;)

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  6. Very Very Cool Sir Micheal, a worthy winner indeed. I didn't realise you had one of the light thingyamebobs under it as well!!! Well done ol' chap!!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Ray, it was that blasted light thingamabob that kickstarted the whole thing!

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  7. Stunning!!! Fantastic workmanship Michael!

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  8. Clever idea and well deserved reward!

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  9. Great Work , Great paint , amazing conception !
    Congratulation Michael
    Greetings

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    Replies
    1. That is incredibly kind of you Vincent.

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  10. That's a great job. Thanks for share how you made it.

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    Replies
    1. You are more than welcome and thank you.

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  11. Hi Michael,

    that's just breathtaking!
    Thanks for the step-by-step view of the efforts you made for this model. Great job!

    Cheers
    Stefan

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    1. Thank you Stefan, that is very kind of you to say so.

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  12. Very appetizing...great work, and great ideas!
    Phil.

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  13. Replies
    1. I'm thrilled you like it Captain, thank you.

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  14. For me it is fun to watch you have lots of fun modeling!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Jay, it is all about the fun factor.

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  15. Brilliant Michael, nice to see how it was constructed :)

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  16. I bow to thee Michael. My god...the muse of modelling has given you her blessing! :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanos you are incredibly kind, such encouraging words.

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  17. You are cooking with this Michael, very imaginative and great modelling skills.
    Cheers,
    Pat

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Pat, it certainly was a blast to do.

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  18. That's 'bloody' outstanding. Love the details, the rivits and beards brilliant and as for the idea of the bubbles!!!!!

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    1. Thank you, there was certainly a lot of head scratching to try and work out how all the parts were to come together, but thrilled with the ned result.

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  19. This is brill. I love what you've done. And how you've done it is great. Very creative.

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    1. Thank you Nathan, very kind of you to say so and welcome aboard Sir.

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  20. Replies
    1. Thank you, finally managed to get the lighting right although it did take a 50 second exposure!

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  21. This gets better and better every time I see a new bit of inspiration or in-progress work...

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  22. Excellent. These pictures make me appreciate it even more.

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  23. Really excellent Michael. I am very glad you posted these images as (1) I had no idea it was all scratch-built; (2) I had no idea it was illuminated as well! A wonderful piece of modelling!

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  24. Stunning Build and paintwork !!!

    best regards Michael

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  25. Great to see the work behind the finished product. Really well executed, and looks like it has been a fun project to do. Now what else can I think of to challenge those master skills !

    Oh and the cowboys will be along shortly... But I will let acquire new shines stuff this weekend first!

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  26. Truly amazing conversion and scratch-building - as well as painting. Best, Dean

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  27. I have to say that your modelling skills are supreme my friend and the work you have put into this display is amazing. Top notch

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