Wednesday, 5 December 2012

So 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy...


December is upon us and the Christmas decorations have been dusted off and once again hoisted up to the title banner of '28mm Victorian Warfare'; all very festive indeed.  With three Sudan based posts and some form of game to play before the end of the year, it certainly promises to be a busy month!   So without any thought to my sanity, I decided that it was time to tackle my first box of Perry plastics!  Armed with side cutters, scalpel and a stiff upper lip - and trying desperately to recall the advice imparted by Dave Docherty of 'One Man and his brushes' fame - I sallied forth.


Within minutes the the work station was utter carnage!  There were dismembered bodies, blood and bad language in plentiful supply as body parts dived for cover in the seemingly impenetrable dining room carpet; spears snapped at the most awkward of places and don't get me started on shoulder slung scabbards and all the while I was thinking of Dave's advice, "a dab of glue to help 'melt' the pieces together."  Melt! Are you sure?  I was going to all this trouble to have them melt!  I was starting to think that my first batch of Beja tribesman were going to look more like the Toxic Avenger!


I need not have worried,  a few calming breaths and a slug of Earl Grey and things were looking decidedly brighter.  All the composite parts were washed and dried and suddenly it all came together rather well (in my humble opinion anyway) and once they were undercoated, I really was rather impressed at how characterful the sculpts actually were. 



Painted to represent the Beja of Kipling fame, all that remained was basing and that final touch, again supplied by Dave, a 'Flag Dude' standard and they were complete!  I was going to squirrel the remaining sprues away in favour for more esoteric shininess, but given that I have gone and thrown my hat into the ring to take part in Curt's '3rd Annual Analogue Hobbies Painting Challenge' they may yet get a reprieve as I look to tidy up the edges of the decidedly unstable lead pile!






Fuzzy Wuzzy


WE'VE FOUGHT with many men acrost the seas,
An' some of 'em was brave an' some was not:
The Paythan an' the Zulu an' Burmese;
But the Fuzzy was the finest o' the lot.
We never got a ha'porth's change of 'im:
'E squatted in the scrub an' 'ocked our 'orses,
'E cut our sentries up at Suakim,
An' 'e played the cat an' banjo with our forces.

So 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your 'ome in the Soudan;
You're a pore benighted 'eathen but a first-class fightin' man;
We gives you your certificate, an' if you want it signed
We'll come an' 'ave a romp with you whenever you're inclined.

We took our chanst among the Khyber 'ills,
The Boers knocked us silly at a mile,
The Burman give us Irriwaddy chills,
An' a Zulu impi dished us up in style:
But all we ever got from such as they
Was pop to what the Fuzzy made us swaller;
We 'eld our bloomin' own, the papers say,
But man for man the Fuzzy knocked us 'oller.

Then 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, an' the missis and the kid;
Our orders was to break you, an' of course we went an' did.
We sloshed you with Martinis, an' it wasn't 'ardly fair;
But for all the odds agin' you, Fuzzy-Wuz, you broke the square.

'E 'asn't got no papers of 'is own,
'E 'asn't got no medals nor rewards,
So we must certify the skill 'e's shown
In usin' of 'is long two-'anded swords:
When 'e's 'oppin' in an' out among the bush
With 'is coffin-'eaded shield an' shovel-spear,
An 'appy day with Fuzzy on the rush
Will last an 'ealthy Tommy for a year.

So 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, an' your friends which are no more,
If we 'adn't lost some messmates we would 'elp you to deplore;
But give an' take's the gospel, an' we'll call the bargain fair,
For if you 'ave lost more than us, you crumpled up the square!

'E rushes at the smoke when we let drive,
An', before we know, 'e's 'ackin' at our 'ead;
'E's all 'ot sand an' ginger when alive,
An' 'e's generally shammin' when 'e's dead.
'E's a daisy, 'e's a ducky, 'e's a lamb!
'E's a injia-rubber idiot on the spree,
'E's the on'y thing that doesn't give a damn
For a Regiment o' British Infantree!

So 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your 'ome in the Soudan;
You're a pore benighted 'eathen but a first-class fightin' man;
An' 'ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, with your 'ayrick 'ead of 'air -
You big black boundin' beggar - for you broke a British square!

Rudyard Kipling

63 comments:

  1. They're beautiful, I've been having problems similar with the plastic perry ACW box, they're all over the fecking gatehouse!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Fran, they really are fiddly little ‘feckers’!

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  2. Great paint Michael , nice work ;) .

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  3. The other (non-Kipling poem) dedicated to Fuzzy-Wuzzies goes like this:

    "Fuzzy-Wuzzy was a bear
    A bear was Fuzzy-Wuzzy.
    When Fuzzy-Wuzzy lost his hair
    He wasn't fuzzy, wuz 'e?"

    Ok, not related to the Sudan campaign at all, really.

    Another great job, there, Michael. I've only had one experience with multi-part 28mm plastics and I must say I didn't enjoy it either! I can appreciate how hard it is and what a great job you've done. Skin tone shading is especially well done!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you very much, all worth it in the end! Loved the alternative poem too!

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    2. Was going to state the same poem.. great fun!

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  4. Lovely work Michael. The Perry Plastics are definitely good quality stuff.
    I love the verse from RK, I have never come across that before and it certainly shows the source of our Fuzzy Wuzzies...

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Scott and always happy to point people in the direction of Mr Kipling.

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  5. Excellent stuff - i share your pain i have several hundred of these blighters to still do , but at least they are off the spues - yours turned out just dandy!

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    Replies
    1. Several hundred! I think I may need to go and lie down, but thank you all the same.

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  6. Those are fantastic, Michael. I'm loving your recent Sudan posts - might I ask what colours you used for the bluey/grey Camel Corps coats?

    Best wishes

    Giles

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    Replies
    1. Giles that is very kind of you, thank you. I will have to add the colour palette a bit later when I get back from work – the memory is not what is should be!

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    2. Now safely home, I can reveal that the palette used started with French Mirage Blue, followed by Dark Blue Grey and highlighted with Light Sea Grey. All Vallejo Model colours.

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  7. You started my morning with a great laugh Michael. They didn't turn out like Toxic Avengers and look rather smashing I think.

    Good luck on the Painting Challenge. Are you going to paint 28mm? And remember last year: don't trust Ray as he stockpiles!

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    Replies
    1. Always delighted to bring a smile to your face Anne and yes, I’m going for 28mm throughout the challenge. I've set myself a modest goal and hoping it will prove to be a motivational exercise more than anything else.

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  8. Excellent work! It's good to see the whites of their eyes; just before they receive the attention of British musketry... ;)

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    Replies
    1. Absolutely terrifying at that range I would imagine! ;)

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  9. Excellent figs, multi-part plastics can be a pain but the end result does usually worth it.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Andrew, certainly worth the effort in the end.

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  10. Splendid, Michael. Plastic, or metal, these chaps look the part! I share your pain with the multi-parts, though!!

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    Replies
    1. That is very kind of you Sidney; I'm hoping that the next batch will be a breeze - so to speak!

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  11. Michael

    The end result is great, and the process had me smiling. Methinks that multipart plastic figs are like sausages and laws - you don't want to watch them being made!

    Cheers
    PD

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Peter, they certainly were an experience, but I feeling a little more confident now.

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  12. Looking just great and I'll see you in the competition!

    Christopher

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    Replies
    1. Thank you and absolutely, although I feel I may be bring up the rear somewhat!

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  13. I like them, Michael. I'm a sucker for multi-pose-plastic figures. I grew up modeling in plastic with Testors liquid cement. And the fragrant aroma of the solvent chemicals of the glue was an added plus!! I'd say more...but I can't remember.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Jay and you are absolutely right about the fringe benefits to plastics; not sure the Saintly Mrs Awdry was as pleased!

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  14. Another smashing batch of minis Michael and entertaining post. Nicely done!

    Although I do prefer metals myself, after all the years dealing with GW's plastic kits for Warhammer, etc. my only response to those that grumble about multipart plastic kits is: (Yawn) :-)

    Cheers,
    Jason

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Jason and yes, I'll be a little more resilient nest time! ;)

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  15. I can sympathize for having the difficulty with some of these models. Did a few a while back ( can't remember what now ) and although they paint nicely, they are a the pains to put together.

    Love the work you did on these though, and especially the skin tones! That is a hard one to hit right, and you nailed it. Best of luck in the contest. Will be watching it with great interest once more this year.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Mr Lee, I really was pleasantly surprised just how great the sculpts were and certainly won't be as apprehensive with the next batch.

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  16. Bloody hell old chap, they look good!!!!!
    Cheers
    paul

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  17. Very nice!
    Glad to see you doing some of these, I can experience it vicariously. ;) We're starting our next VSF campaign and I narrowly avoided committing to a new army: Ottoman Empire, and this kit was going to be my askari troops (with the bald, fez & turban heads).

    Whenever I hear Fuzzy Wuzzy I think of the Fuzzy Wuzzy Was a Bear tongue twister ;) I heard it a bit different than Rosbif:

    Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear
    Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair
    Was Fuzzy Wuzzy fuzzy? Was he?

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  18. You've got to love a bear called Fuzzy Wuzzy even if he wasn't fuzzy!! I think the next batch will have to have the fez and turbaned heads, they look like great fun to do.

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  19. Superb painting and basing Michael, and the flag finishes them off a treat. The flesh tones look really good, would you mind sharing your formula please?

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    1. Many thanks Pat; there is no secret with the palette, which is the Foundry African Flesh. That said I have additional highlights for the face and fingers.

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  20. Lovely work as ususal sir!

    I've got 120 of these little chaps and I must admit I didn't have the problems you seem to have experienced. There was certainly a lot of work clipping them out but it was worth it.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, I think the difficulty came through naivety, but confident that the next batch will be easier - well here's hoping.

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  22. Those look great. Really like your dark skin tones.

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  23. Lovely stuff, now you should get the rest of the box assembled fr the challenge!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you; I think you're right it is a perfect opportunity to finish them off.

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  24. Superb work Michael - they look brill!

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  25. Great work there Michael and there remind me of the chaps in Four Feathers, the remark. I real Gordon of Khartoum vibe going on later and long may it continue

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  26. Thank you Sir, there are a few more to finish off before a change of pace.

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  27. The end result is absolutly wonderful, those minis are looking great!
    Phil.

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  28. Michael:

    I missed this post when earlier - wow - incredible work as always. What a subject too. The b&w image looks like a still photo. The eyes are so well executed. Happy Holidays, Dean

    P.S. Thanks for visiting my blog - I hope to pick up the pace a bit in the new year.

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  29. The skin work on your Fuzzies looks too real.

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  30. Fantastic Michael - they're making me want to get my Sudan stuff back on the table!

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  31. They look excellent! I love the skin tone!

    Greetings
    Peter
    http://www.peterscave.blogspot.be/

    ReplyDelete
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